Renewable energy is electricity generated from eco-friendly fuel resources, such as Texas wind energy, water, biomass or solar – fuel sources that are continuously replenished or are "renewable".

Generally these renewable energy resources are considered the cleanest forms of power generation and have low environmental impact. Renewable energy focuses on the production, transmission and storage of sustainable energy sources such as wind, solar power, geothermal, hydropower and biomass. When you enhance your bachelor's degree in Electronics Engineering Technology with a specialization in Renewable Energy, you’ll emerge at graduation with not only a strong engineering technology and electronics background, but also knowledge of renewable technologies and alternative power sources.

Renewable energy is the term used to describe energy that comes from sources whose supplies are regenerative and virtually inexhaustible. Among these sources are sunshine , wind , water , vegetation , and the heat of the earth .

By choosing renewable energy, you and your customers protect the environment and secure the benefits of energy independence while reducing long-term energy costs.

A dynamic city like San Francisco requires the efficient use of clean, renewable energy to meet the needs of today and future generations. Innovative policies and programs help San Franciscans use energy wisely, while saving money and reducing environmental impacts.

The batteries could allow the grid to accommodate greater amounts of intermittent renewable energy. As Aquion scales up production and brings down costs, the batteries could also be used instead of a type of natural gas power plant—called a peaker plant—often used to balance supply and demand on the grid. When recharged using renewables, the batteries don’t need fuel, so they’re cleaner than the natural gas power plants.

Geothermal Power

Geothermal power is cost effective, reliable, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, but has historically been limited to areas near tectonic plate boundaries. Recent technological advances have dramatically expanded the range and size of viable resources, especially for applications such as home heating, opening a potential for widespread exploitation.

Geothermal PowerGeothermal wells release greenhouse gases trapped deep within the earth, but these emissions are much lower per energy unit than those of fossil fuels. As a result, geothermal power has the potential to help mitigate global warming if widely deployed in place of fossil fuels.

Geothermal power uses the heat locked away inside the Earth to power mechanical devices that create electricity. That basic principle is what underlies the quest for geothermal "resources," which are really just heat sources.

For the most part, geothermal power uses super-heated rocks and fluid flows like hot-springs to ferry heat from the planet's interior out to us -- but all of it, eventually, comes from the center.

The concept behind geothermal power generation is simple. Drill a hole deep into the earth to tap into a pressurized area of hot water and steam. Pipe the steam to the surface and use it to drive a turbine to generate electricity.

There are three types of geothermal power plants: dry steam, flash, and binary. Dry steam, the oldest geothermal technology, takes steam out of fractures in the ground and uses it to directly drive a turbine. Flash plants pull deep, high-pressure hot water into cooler, low-pressure water.

The steam that results from this process is used to drive the turbine. In binary plants, the hot water is passed by a secondary fluid with a much lower boiling point than water. This causes the secondary fluid to turn to vapor, which then drives a turbine. Most geothermal power plants in the future will be binary plants.

There are three designs for geothermal power plants, all of which pull hot water and steam from the ground, use it, and then return it as warm water to prolong the life of the heat source. In the simplest design, the steam goes directly through the turbine, then into a condenser where the steam is condensed into water. In a second approach, very hot water is depressurized or “flashed” into steam which can then be used to drive the turbine.

Geothermal energy from the bottom of the Earth is closer to the surface in some areas than others. When the underground steam or hot water can be harnessed and put to the surface May be used to generate electricity.

These sources of geothermal energy exist in certain geologically unstable parts of the world such as Chile, Iceland, New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and Italy. The two most important areas for the United States are in the Yellowstone basin and northern California. Iceland has produced 170 MW of geothermal power and heated 86% of all homes during the years 2000 through geothermal energy.

Geothermal energy is generated in over 20 countries. The United States is the world's largest producer, and the largest geothermal development in the world is The Geysers north of San Francisco in California. In Iceland, many of the buildings and even swimming pools are heated with geothermal hot water. Iceland has at least 25 active volcanoes and many hot springs and geysers.

Geothermal energy production is very scaleable. Ranging from single dwelling residential heat exchangers, to small power plants for small villages, to large power plants for entire cities.

Geothermal energy has been used for thousands of years in some countries for cooking and heating. It is simply power derived from the Earth's internal heat.This thermal energy is contained in the rock and fluids beneath Earth's crust. It can be found from shallow ground to several miles below the surface, and even farther down to the extremely hot molten rock called magma.

There are many advantages of geothermal energy. It can be extracted without burning a fossil fuel such as coal, gas, or oil. Geothermal fields produce only about one-sixth of the carbon dioxide that a relatively clean natural-gas-fueled power plant produces.

Binary plants release essentially no emissions. Unlike solar and wind energy, geothermal energy is always available, 365 days a year. It's also relatively inexpensive; savings from direct use can be as much as 80 percent over fossil fuels.

The earth itself contains a considerable level of energy stored and dissipated as heat. All of this geothermal energy has the potential to generate geothermal energy to provide large amounts of electricity. Geothermal energy is energy obtained by tapping the heat of the earth itself, usually from kilometers deep into the Earth's crust.

It is expensive to build a power station but operating costs are low resulting in low energy costs for suitable sites. Ultimately, this energy derives from heat in the Earth's core.